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Coriolanus Conclusion

This Study Guide consists of approximately 234 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Coriolanus.
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Conclusion

Coriolanus remains an anomaly among Shakespeare's tragedies. Commentators tend to agree that the source of the play's unique status is the principal character himself, whose arrogance, class pride, and violent behavior seriously undermine his role as a tragic hero. Furthermore, the irony and paradox in Shakespeare's treatment of Coriolanus have additionally limited audiences' sympathy for his downfall. For most scholars these perplexing elements of the tragedy are clear indicators that Coriolanus defies conclusive appraisals and escapes final and definitive analysis. Indeed, if it is the true mark of Shakespeare's genius that his works consistently resist definition, then perhaps this elusive tragedy may be, as T. S. Eliot declared, "Shakespeare's most assured artistic success."

(See also Shakespearean Criticism, Vols. 9, 17, and 30)

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This section contains 122 words
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Coriolanus from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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