Wilfred Owen Writing Styles in Collected Poems

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Point of View

In Owen's poetry, he uses a number of different points of view, but most commonly, Owen uses a first person perspective with presumably himself as the narrator. It is not entirely certain that Owen himself is meant to be the narrator in these poems because he almost never gives names to his narrator. Furthermore, the narrator in these poems is almost always a passive observer and rarely takes part in the major action of the poem. For instance, in Owen's most famous poem "Dulce Et Decorum Est", Owen watches another soldier die in a gas attack. While Owen describes the narrator putting on his own gas mask and walking behind the cart with the soldier's dead body, the main action of the poem focuses on the death of the other soldier. A major exception to this general rule is found in "Strange Meeting", where the narrator...

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This section contains 939 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Collected Poems Study Guide
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