Study Guide

Collected Poems, 1909-1962 - Five-Finger Exercises Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 45 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Collected Poems, 1909-1962.
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Five-Finger Exercises Summary

I. Lines to a Persian Cat: In this first part, Eliot talks of joy being fleeting in life. The songbirds eventually move on - signifying youth - and we age and have aches and pains and work hard. He asks when an easier existence will come.

II. Lines to a Yorkshire Terrier: Eliot says all living creatures: cats, dogs, and even undertakers, will one day return to dust. No one can cheat death.

III. Lines to a Duck in the Park: Eliot talks of seeing life awaken in the park one morning. Religious imagery is prevalent in this section as he talks of a snake alluding to Satan and also writes of the Bread and Wine. He says to let the birds of the air have their due, and man, too, as one day the devouring worm will have us all...

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This section contains 313 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Collected Poems, 1909-1962 Study Guide
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