Close to Shore: The Terrifying Shark Attacks of 1916 - Chapters 13 and 14 Summary & Analysis

Michael Capuzzo
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A Long-Range Cruising Rogue

As the shark-patrol steered its motorboats back and forth, hunting for the shark, the shark was picking up the many vibrations and sensations that the boats were causing. The sensations could have signaled that an abundant number of prey was available to the shark. The men shot at several animals in the water. The men could have very well had the man-eating shark in its cross-hairs since it was commonly accepted that the shark had stayed in the area. But it's difficult to catch serial-killing man-eating sharks. The water conceals their crimes and aids in their escape. Through the years, there has been vigorous disagreement about whether there is such a thing as a man-eating shark.

Dr. Sir Victor Coppleson, an Australian surgeon, coined the phrase "rouge shark," feeling there was evidence that if a shark experiences killing or...

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This section contains 674 words
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