A Clockwork Orange Historical Context

This Study Guide consists of approximately 67 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of A Clockwork Orange.
This section contains 507 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A Clockwork Orange Study Guide

In 1961, the year after Burgess had written his first draft of A Clockwork Orange, he and his wife took a trip to Leningrad (now St. Petersburg) in what was then the Soviet Union. During that trip, Burgess was appalled and intrigued by the roaming gangs of hoodlums he saw, called stilyaqi. Burgess noted how the police, preoccupied with ideological crimes against the state, had a difficult time controlling these unruly youths. He also noted the similarities of the Russian and British youth subcultures and was inspired to fashion a hooligan character who was a composite of the ways in which youth spoke, acted, and dressed in Russia and England.

Hence, Alex and his droogs—"droog" derived from the Russian word "drugi," which means "friends in violence." The stilyaqi, or style-boys, sprung up in Russia during the 1940s and were roughly contemporaneous with American beats. The stilyaqi listened...

(read more from the Historical Context section)

This section contains 507 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A Clockwork Orange Study Guide
Copyrights
Novels for Students
A Clockwork Orange from Novels for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.