For a Citizen of These United States Historical Context

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Only a few decades after its declaration of independence from England, the United States of America became known as a melting pot, so named because of the number of immigrants who landed on its shores from all over the world. For a while, this influx of diverse groups of people was a welcome sight, for it helped to "grow" the new country and make it stronger. But personal bias and stereotypes do not go away quietly, and before too long immigrants— especially those of color or distinguishable physical features—found themselves the victims of racism and unfair treatment in the work place, on the streets, and in residential communities everywhere. Asian immigrants were no exception, and in 1960 nearly two hundred years after gaining independence, the United States was still a hostile place for many foreigners, including the Lee family who arrived that year.

Five years after the Lee's...

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This section contains 734 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the For a Citizen of These United States Study Guide
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Poetry for Students
For a Citizen of These United States from Poetry for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.