Cormac McCarthy Writing Styles in Cities of the Plain

This Study Guide consists of approximately 40 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Cities of the Plain.
This section contains 1,291 words
(approx. 4 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Cities of the Plain Study Guide

Point of View

Cormac McCarthy uses a very restricted, third-person, and omniscient narrative style. The story follows multiple characters and can therefore be considered all knowing, but the narration normally remains detached, never entering the minds of the characters. If a chapter is following Billy it merely follows him, watching him much as a camera might. We do not get the story from Billy's perspective. As a result the narrator is completely dependable because it only describe what happens and does not make any guesses.

We as readers are almost never explicitly told what a character is thinking or feeling. Instead the author describes their actions and gives us their words. From them we can infer emotion.

The only exception to this detachment is Magdalena. She is the one character whose emotions we are told about. For example, when Eduardo confronts her about leaving the White Lake without his...

(read more)

This section contains 1,291 words
(approx. 4 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Cities of the Plain Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
Cities of the Plain from BookRags. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.