Circe - Chapter Sixteen, Seventeen, and Eighteen Summary & Analysis

Madeline Miller
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Summary

Chapter Sixteen begins the night after Circe and Odysseus first sleep together. The following month passes quickly, with Odysseus spending his days fixing his ship, and his nights in Circe's bed. Though the sex was pleasurable, Circe remarks the greatest pleasure she received was after, when Odysseus would tell her about the Greek's efforts at Troy, complaining about Agamemnon and about the hierarchical structure of battle. But there is one character in battle who is often forgotten, this character being the "mind to guide the purpose, and not flinch from war's necessities" (213). Odysseus played such a role, and he explains to Circe the various duties he had to observe. Every night, Odysseus tells her stories such as these, but never does Circe reciprocate; she only listens. One evening, when the month comes to a close, Odysseus tells Circe that he...

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This section contains 1,639 words
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