Study Guide

Cicero: The Life and Times of Rome's Greatest Politician - Chapter 14, The Heir, Enter Octavian, March-December, 44 B.C. Summary & Analysis

Anthony Everitt
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Chapter 14, The Heir, Enter Octavian, March-December, 44 B.C. Summary and Analysis

Caesar was dead, but Brutus and Cassius had made no preparations for the aftermath, for which they have been criticized from soon after Caesar's death to the present day. Marc Antony was still around, a young man in his thirties, and could claim to rule. Some thought he should have been killed as well, however, including Cicero. The Senate gave immunity to the assassins, but let Caesar's laws stand as legitimate. At the funeral ceremony, Antony gave the funeral oration and a riot broke out; the Senate house was burned. Cicero was frustrated with the incompetence of the assassins, though he agreed with their actions and thought Antony was the prelude to a new autocracy. Irritated that he had no influence, he left the city.

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This section contains 545 words
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