Study Guide

Cicero: The Life and Times of Rome's Greatest Politician - Chapter 12, Philosophical Investigations, Thoughts on the Nature of Things, 46-44 B.C., Chapter 13, Why, This Is Violence!, Plots and Conspiracies, January—March 44 B.C. Summary & Analysis

Anthony Everitt
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Chapter 12, Philosophical Investigations, Thoughts on the Nature of Things, 46-44 B.C., Chapter 13, Why, This Is Violence!, Plots and Conspiracies, January—March 44 B.C. Summary and Analysis

The Republic was lost and Cicero turned from politics to writing. He wrote more between 46 and 44 B.C. than during the entire previous sixty years of his life. Cicero wrote on many subjects. First, he set out to defend oratory against recent criticisms against the style in which he was raised. He also wrote philosophy, though he was not an original thinker. Instead, he translated the major ideas from Greek philosophy into Latin, an invaluable service to the rest of history. In this way, Cicero was able to share the ideas of Greek...

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This section contains 407 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Cicero: The Life and Times of Rome's Greatest Politician Study Guide
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