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The Chrysanthemums Essay | Critical Essay #3

This Study Guide consists of approximately 64 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Chrysanthemums.
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Critical Essay #3

In the following essay, Sullivan explores the comparisons drawn between the characters and the dogs in "The Chrysanthemums" and the light this sheds on the social and sexual relationships within the story.

Anyone reading John Steinbeck's "The Chrysanthemums" cannot help being struck by the repeated association of unpleasant canine characteristics with the otherwise attractive Elisa Allen. These associations identify her with the visiting tinker's mongrel dog, further suggesting a parallel between the Al-len's two ranch shepherds and the tinker and Elisa's husband, Henry. The correspondences between people and dogs elucidate the social and sexual relationships of the three humans, as well as foreshadow and explain Elisa's failure at the end of the story to escape from her unproductive and sterile lifestyle.

The dog imagery related to Elisa is uncomplimentary. In her garden, she destroys unpleasant creatures such as "aphids," "bugs," "snails," "cutworms," and similar "pests" with her "terrier...

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This section contains 1,280 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Chrysanthemums Study Guide
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The Chrysanthemums from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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