Orson Scott Card Writing Styles in Children of the Mind

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Point of View

The novel is told from an omniscient third person narrative point of view, which enables Card to tell a story that literally spans light years. Given the variety and scope of the events he relates, the point of view he uses enables him to juggle multiple plot lines throughout the novel with a great deal of effectiveness. In fact, Card's ability to switch from one narrative line to the next enables him to keep his subplots from getting tangled which is admirable given that some characters cross from one subplot to the next. For instance, Miro stays with Old Valentine and petitions Ender for his help at her urging. However, he also plays a central role in Jane's initiative to find and communicate with the descoladores.

Third person, omniscient narration allows Card to present the events of the novel through the eyes of most of his...

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This section contains 1,066 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Children of the Mind Study Guide
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