Childhood's End Themes & Symbolism

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Religion versus Science

Repeated throughout the novel, this argument is perhaps the most strongly represented by the Freedom League. They oppose the Overlords, who represent science and reason. The League is led by Alexander Wainwright, a former clergyman known for his piousness and honesty. However, many people's faiths are shaken after the Overlords donate a television-like device that dispels many religious beliefs.

On the other hand, the Overlords' home planet was revealed during the syance at Rupert Boyce's party. This message did not come from a concrete source. It somehow came through the Ouija board from a supernatural source. Karellen also brings up the argument that if Rupert didn't believe in the content of the books in his library, then why was he so sensitive about their care. Therefore, it can be assumed that Rupert possesses some sort of faith, or belief in a supernatural power.

Enslavement versus Free Will

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This section contains 506 words
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