Literary Precedents for Cheri and The Last of Cheri

This Study Guide consists of approximately 32 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Cheri and The Last of Cheri.
This section contains 142 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Cheri and The Last of Cheri Study Guide

The best precedent for most of Colette's fiction is the work that she had already done. As Janet Planner has observed, more than any other leading female European writer, Colette wrote about what she knew. She tended to take little from other people's books.

However, two now virtually unknown (at least in America) French women writers, the Countess de Noailles and the Princess Bibesco, had dealt with similar arrangements between people — but, not nearly so well. Since the character Cheri may be styled on Auguste Heriot, a man whom Colette knew very well, the precedent for these novels is probably more personal than literary. The libretto of DerRosenkavalier, of course, contains such a liaison, as does Benjamin Constant's 1816 novel Adolphe. There is no precedent, in life or art, for the superlative quality of the representation of life in these novels.

(read more from the Literary Precedents section)

This section contains 142 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Cheri and The Last of Cheri Study Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Cheri and The Last of Cheri from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.