Avi and Edward Irving Wortis Writing Styles in The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle

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The book is written entirely in the first person. The narrator is Charlotte, and she tells of her adventure long after it has occurred. This is evident from the last scene of the book, when she once again boards the Seahawk. She writes in a reflective way that shows maturity and hints at a writer who has grown up and experienced many things. Charlotte is aware of her audience, and at times she addresses the reader directly, such when she admits to the reader, with some embarrassment, that at one point she would have done anything to be in Jaggery's good graces once again.

Charlotte relays to the reader her feelings during the events, but she avoids trying to interpret the feelings and motives of the other characters. An example of this, When Hollybrass is whipping Zachariah, Charlotte describes Hollybrass's body language but not what he...

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This section contains 889 words
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