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The Chairs Essay | Critical Essay #4

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Critical Essay #4

Jacobs discusses the nature of absurdity as it applies to drama. He argues that The Chairs, rather than being an example of theatre of the absurd, is actually "straightforward and obvious good sense."

Absurd, absurd, absurd. It's time to put this silly misrepresentation of avant-garde playwrights to rest. As for Samuel Beckett, he is melancholy, hopeless, pessimistic, pejoristic, and this is not absurd. It's a conviction of man's brutality and life's difficulty. Living through obscene poverty and the ferocity of Hitler's Germans, Beckett came to conclusions that are intelligent and sensible, not absurd.

But the case most at point is Eugene lonesco' s brilliant play The Chairs. Rather than absurd, it is at least for the vast majority of our population straightforward and obvious good sense.

The old couple has just died. The Orator strives to speak. His words are not understood. Then he writes the message left...

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This section contains 600 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Chairs Study Guide
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The Chairs from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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