Jack London Writing Styles in The Call of the Wild

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Point of View

Point of view is the narrative perspective from which a work is presented to the reader. The Call of the Wild is told from a very unusual point of view—that of a dog. Yet a human narrator stands outside of Buck's consciousness and makes sense of the dog's universe to human readers. London also tries to maintain Buck's believability as a dog. So while he explains his motivations, London reminds the reader that Buck does not actually think. After a lengthy passage about Buck's moral decline, explaining why Buck steals food from his master, London writes, "Not that Buck reasoned it out.... unconsciously he accommodated himself to the new mode of life."

Allegory

Many critics perceive that The Call of the Wild was more than the story of a dog. Many believe that it is an allegory about human society. An allegory tells two...

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This section contains 851 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Call of the Wild Study Guide
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The Call of the Wild from Novels for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.