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Caddie Woodlawn Chapter Summary & Analysis - Chapter 17, Pee-Wee Summary

Carol Ryrie Brink
This Study Guide consists of approximately 79 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Caddie Woodlawn.
This section contains 652 words
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Chapter 17, Pee-Wee Summary

Some days later, Caddie, Tom and Warren are planning their day's fun at the breakfast table. Johnny jokes with them about "all play and no work" and tells the children they are to plow the far field. Caddie, Tom and Warren are eager to get Betsy and the plow. Indian John's dog follows them, barking.

The first few furrows are fun, but soon plowing becomes monotonous. A little bird flies overhead, calling "pee-wee, pee-wee." Tom suggests that only one of them needs to follow the plow, so they can take turns. The other two will sit by the fence and tell stories. Tom takes the plow first so that he can think of a story. Caddie and Warren usually just retell stories from books or ones they have heard from Robert Ireton, but Tom's stories always are in demand because they...

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This section contains 652 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Caddie Woodlawn Study Guide
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Caddie Woodlawn from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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