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The Bronze Bow Social Sensitivity

Elizabeth George Speare
This Study Guide consists of approximately 82 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Bronze Bow.
This section contains 227 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
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Social Sensitivity

Given the turmoil in the Middle East today, The Bronze Bow's depiction of military oppression in ancient Palestine could spark a discussion of the current Palestine situation, as well as a more general discussion about human rights.

Even if the Romans did bring better sanitation, better roads, and wealth to a region that had been wracked by almost constant warfare, they also became the oppressors, and readers may want to address the major issues of oppression and the desire of people to be free.

The religious aspect of The Bronze Bow may be controversial. The novel is undeniably rooted in Christian theology, but its main concept is common to many religions and philosophies—that giving in to hatred is foolish. At the novel's end Daniel is not necessarily a converted believer in Christ; he is converted to Christ's way of thinking about love, hate, and life's priorities...

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This section contains 227 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Bronze Bow Study Guide
Copyrights
The Bronze Bow from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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