E. Annie Proulx Writing Styles in Brokeback Mountain

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Proulx uses setting details to heighten the thematic significance of the story. The most effective use of setting as symbol occurs when she juxtaposes harsh and beautiful images of the landscape's cruel beauty to suggest the difficult nature of Ennis's and Jack's relationship. Proulx presents this juxtaposition first when Ennis and Jack initially herd the sheep up to Brokeback Mountain. The narrator likens the sheep's movement up the trail to the flow of “dirty water through the timber and out above the tree line into the great flowery meadows and the coursing, endless wind.” The contrast between the dirty sheep and the meadow flowers seems to foreshadow the love that will grow between the two men as well as the prejudice their relationship will inspire.

This foreshadowing is reinforced when Proulx juxtaposes the “sweetened” cold air of the mountain on their first morning with the phallic...

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This section contains 265 words
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Buy the Brokeback Mountain Study Guide
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