Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art Essay

This Study Guide consists of approximately 28 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art.
This section contains 1,813 words
(approx. 5 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art Study Guide

Jeannine Johnson received her Ph.D. from Yale University and is currently visiting assistant professor of English at Wake Forest University. In the following essay, Johnson demonstrates that although Keats 'sprayer in "Bright star!" goes unanswered, the poet is not disappointed but remains content.

In "Bright star! would I were steadfast as thou art," the object of John Keats's initial address is the North Star, or polestar. He speaks of it as existing "in lone splendour," referring to the unequaled brightness of this star. Navigators have long relied on the North Star to help them determine latitude and north-south direction in the northern hemisphere, and at the beginning of the poem, the poet is in the position of the navigator, observing the star and looking to it for guidance. Yet when Keats invokes this relationship, he reverses the parties' normal positions: instead of a navigator looking at the...

(read more from the Critical Essay #1 section)

This section contains 1,813 words
(approx. 5 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art Study Guide
Copyrights
Poetry for Students
Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art from Poetry for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.