Writing Techniques in Breakfast at Tiffany's

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In this novel, as in most of Capote's novels, symbols play a significant role.

The first of these is the African statue in the photograph taken by I. Y. Yunioshi, Holly's former neighbor. This wood sculpture, which combines the elongated head of the primitive style with Holly's facial characteristics, suggests her role as the feminine ideal, not only for civilized men like Joe Bell and the American photographer, but also for primitive artists like the African woodcarver. Holly's power to inspire art is further seen in this novel which, for the narrator, constitutes an attempt to understand Holly's personality and her appeal to almost all types of men.

A second symbol is the ornate birdcage which the narrator admires and Holly buys for him. The narrator considers this cage another work of art, but for Holly it represents a loss of freedom. Thus, she cannot appreciate the inherent beauty...

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This section contains 471 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Breakfast at Tiffany's Study Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Breakfast at Tiffany's from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.