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Both Your Houses Themes

This Study Guide consists of approximately 45 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Both Your Houses.
This section contains 1,230 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
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Themes

Moral Corruption and Decline

In this play, Sol Fitzmaurice represents a refined form of moral corruption. Sol's only interests are drinking and increasing his own personal wealth, which indicates that any sense he may have had once of using his office to serve the public has long ago evaporated. When faced with a young idealist like Alan McClean, however, Sol is able to show his empathy, remembering his own roots as a young idealist. He acts indignant at the news that there are members of Congress who would benefit from appropriations, but Sol's corruption is so thorough that no one takes his indignation seriously. His speech to Alan about how he became "a fat crook" in order to make his constituents happy might seem tinged with remorse, but, despite any regrets he might have, Sol throws himself into the corrupt lifestyle with zeal, and makes it possible to pass...

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This section contains 1,230 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Both Your Houses Study Guide
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Both Your Houses from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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