Blues Ain't No Mockingbird Themes

This Study Guide consists of approximately 30 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Blues Ain't No Mockingbird.
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Race and Racism

The story's conflict is really a conflict over race and representation: Granny believes that the filmmakers have no right, uninvited, to shoot footage of her, her family, and her home; the filmmakers, meanwhile, are attempting to use her life to make a political and social statement, sponsored by the state government, about the black rural poor. The filmmakers, then, want to see the family as "representative" or "typical"; Granny sees herself and her family as individuals. This difference in attitude is demonstrated in the first dialogue between the filmmakers and Granny. When they first approach Granny, they fail to greet her. She interrupts them with an ironic "Good mornin." They respond sheepishly, with a guilty, hangdog expression. They continue, though, referring to Granny as "aunty," a condescending, stereotypical term used for older black women. Later in the story, when Camera repeats the appellation, Granny snaps backs...

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This section contains 734 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Blues Ain't No Mockingbird Study Guide
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Short Stories for Students
Blues Ain't No Mockingbird from Short Stories for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.