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Blood-Burning Moon Themes

This Study Guide consists of approximately 30 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Blood-Burning Moon.
This section contains 913 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
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White racism within the context of the segregated South is one of the major themes in "Blood-Burning Moon." The town in which Louisa, Tom, and Bob live is rigidly segregated, a hill dividing the "white town" from the shanties of the black "factory town." Although slavery no longer exists, the pattern of impoverished blacks working for wealthy whites continues: Louisa works as a domestic servant in the Stone family household, while Tom works as a field hand for the same family.

Bob Stone's racism is a significant component of both his attraction to Louisa and his furious jealousy towards Tom. Stone nostalgically recalls the days of slavery, when a white master could have any black woman he chose. He sees the need to hide his sexual relationship with Louisa as a sign that the Stones have "lost ground." The thought that he might have a black rival is...

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This section contains 913 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Blood-Burning Moon Study Guide
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Short Stories for Students
Blood-Burning Moon from Short Stories for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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