Additional Resources for Bartleby the Scrivener, A Tale of Wall Street by Herman Melville

This Study Guide consists of approximately 39 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Bartleby the Scrivener, A Tale of Wall Street.
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Fisher, Marvin "'Bartleby,' Melville's Circumscribed Scrivener," The Southern Review, Vol. X, No. 1, Winter, 1974, pp 59-79.

Fisher surveys several critical interpretations of "Bartleby" and concludes that Bartleby is intended to represent humankind generally.

Kaplan, Morton, and Kloss, Robert "Fantasy of Passivity. Melville's 'Bartleby the Scrivener'," in The Unspoken Motive: A Guide to Psycho-analytic Literary Criticism, Free Press, 1973, pp 63-79.

This article diagnoses Bartleby as a manic depressive and insists that the lawyer's passivity is a neurotic attempt to repress aggressive and violent impulses.

Kuebnch, David. "Melville's Doctrine of Assumptions: The Hidden Ideology of Capitalist Production in 'Bartleby,'"

The New England Quarterly, Vol LXK,No. 3, September, 1996, pp. 381-405.

This article argues that "Bartleby" is about class conflict and demonstrates the false ideology of the capitalist class in New York in the 1850s

Morgan, Winifred. "Bartleby and the Failure of Conventional Virtue," in Renascence, Vol. LXTX, No. 3, September, 1996, pp...

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This section contains 290 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Bartleby the Scrivener, A Tale of Wall Street Study Guide
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Bartleby the Scrivener, A Tale of Wall Street from Short Stories for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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