The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt - Chapters 32-33 Summary & Analysis

Blanche Wiesen Cook
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Chapters 32-33 Summary and Analysis

Eleanor considered her work on the Human Rights Commission to be more important than her work in the General Assembly. She found the experience to be very educational and was eventually elected chairman. They worked on an International Bill of Rights. Eleanor's work for the United Nations occupied five to six months of the year. This meant that she maintained a very busy schedule.

Working on the International Bill of Rights resulted in many tedious discussions and meetings with the Russians, who kept trying to incorporate Communist philosophy into the document. In addition, the different economic and governmental structures in the different countries complicated the situation in making it hard to gain acceptance. By the 1948 Paris session of the General Assembly, they had the document prepared. Eleanor thought it would meet with quick approval but was wrong. The committee debate alone lasted more...

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This section contains 392 words
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