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Neil DeGrasse Tyson
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What is the implication of Tyson’s subtle references to religion in the titles of his first three chapters?

The titles of Tyson's first three chapters each make subtle yet clear references to religion: "The Greatest Story Ever Told," "On Earth as in the Heavens," and "Let There be Light" (17, 34, 48). While Tyson rarely mentions religion explicitly throughout the text, these obvious religious hints can either be interpreted as Tyson's attempt to bridge the gap between religion and science, or as a criticism of religions' historical reluctance to accept scientific discovery.

Recently, Tyson was brought under fire for a tweet: “On this day long ago, a child was born who, by age 30, would transform the world. Happy Birthday Isaac Newton b. Dec 25, 1642” (twitter); does he have an innate tension with religious theory? Or is this just an exemplification of his sense of humor?

What are the innate deficiencies of the human senses Tyson identifies throughout the text?

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This section contains 1,393 words
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Buy the Astrophysics For People in a Hurry Study Guide
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