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Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret Plot Summary

This Study Guide consists of approximately 53 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret.
This section contains 383 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
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Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret Summary & Study Guide Description

Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret Summary & Study Guide includes comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book. This study guide contains the following sections:

This detailed literature summary also contains Related Titles/Adaptations and a Free Quiz on Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret by Judy Blume.

Overview

Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret is a funny, reassuring novel. The humor of the novel arises from three sources: reversals of expectations, ambiguous actions that are misperceived, and Margaret's unintentionally funny narration. Many reversals occur in the novel; for instance, the students in Margaret's sixth-grade class try to fool their teacher, Miles J. Benedict, by not writing their names on a test only to find graded tests on the appropriate desks the next class period because Benedict recognized his students' handwriting, and thus the tricksters are tricked.

When Margaret and the other girls in the PTS club do their breast increasing exercises to the chant, "We must, we must, we must increase our busts," they are hoping to impress boys by improving their appearance, but they are laughed at by Moose Freed and Nancy's brother, Evan, who overhear the "secret" meeting. This is an example of comic ambiguity, an action fine under one set of circumstances but inappropriate in others. Margaret's language in her firstperson narration brims with humor. In one of her diary entries, Margaret asks God if he would mind her doing a project on religion, assuring him that she would "tell you all about it." Margaret's mine of misinformation leads to several comic anxieties, such as her fear that she will catch Laura Danker's bad reputation by sitting next to her.

In addition to its rich humor, the novel addresses two serious subjects: sexual maturation and Margaret's involvement with religion. Margaret's anxieties about her appearance and growth are those of every adolescent. Margaret's solution to her anxiety—accepting herself and letting time produce the changes she desires—is possible only when Margaret realizes her truth is more important to her than Nancy's lies about menstruation. Margaret learns religious toleration from seeing the suffering of her parents, who have married outside the faiths of their families. Religious and racial intolerance and bigotry tear apart many young adults' lives, so Margaret's pain is readily understandable.

For an adolescent going through a crisis similar to Margaret's, Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret will not only be a book but an understanding friend. Perhaps because of this quality, the novel was included on the New York Times list of Outstanding Books in 1970 and the American Library Association's List of Notable Books 1940-1970.

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This section contains 383 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret Study Guide
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Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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