Araby Essay

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Stone is an educator, editor, and Charles Dick-ens scholar. In the following excerpted essay, he discusses some of the autobiographical elements of "Araby," which include Joyce's childhood in Dublin, Ireland, and how the exoticism of the real-life Araby festival, with its Far Eastern overtones, impacted the young Joyce. Stone also discusses the poet James Mangan's influence on Joyce's framing of the narrator's adoration of (the character of) Mangan's sister.

For "Araby" preserves a central episode in Joyce's life, an episode he will endlessly recapitulate. The boy in "Araby," like the youthful Joyce himself, must begin to free himself from the nets and trammels of society. That beginning involves painful farewells and disturbing dislocations. The boy must dream "no more of enchanted days." He must forego the shimmering mirage of childhood, begin to see things as they really are. But to see things as they really are is...

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This section contains 2,111 words
(approx. 6 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Araby Study Guide
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Araby from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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