Forgot your password?  
Related Topics

Frank McCourt Writing Styles in Angela's Ashes

Frank McCourt
This Study Guide consists of approximately 107 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Angela's Ashes.
This section contains 506 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Angela's Ashes Study Guide

Style

Angela's Ashes is narrated in the first person, and apart from the first part of chapter one, it is told in the present tense. The present tense narration serves the author's purpose well as it conveys the immediacy of the child's experience and avoids giving the impression, as a past tense might, that the story is being told by an adult reflecting on his childhood.

The language used throughout is colloquial and earthy. Slang, Irishisms, and vulgar expressions are used frequently, and these convey the way people really talked in Limerick during the author's childhood. Having a "fine fist," for example, means that a person has good handwriting. To go "beyond the beyonds" is to behave in an outrageous manner. Some words will be unfamiliar to American ears: "gob" is slang for mouth and "fags" are cigarettes. To call someone an "eejit" is to insult them, and the expression...

(read more from the Style section)

This section contains 506 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Angela's Ashes Study Guide
Copyrights
Angela's Ashes from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook