Andrew Jackson: His Life and Times - Chapter 22 Summary & Analysis

H. W. Brands
This Study Guide consists of approximately 76 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Andrew Jackson.
This section contains 631 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Andrew Jackson: His Life and Times Study Guide

Chapter 22 Summary and Analysis

"The Second Washington" closes out Jackson's service during the War of 1812. It dwells lightly with the issue of martial law, which some historians find a blot on his memory. When the retreating British fleet promptly retakes Fort Bowyer, Jackson feels justified in keeping martial law in effect word comes of a ratified peace treaty. The "stiff-necked" general is rather tactless in treating as speculators people like Vincent Nolte, with just claims for compensation for merchandise commandeered early in the city's defense. Jackson arrests a Louisiana legislator, Louis Louaillier, for publishing an article about his "abuse of power," and when Judge Hall issues a writ of habeas corpus, Jackson exiles him "from the limits of my encampment" for abetting mutiny. On Mar. 13, word comes by special courier from Washington, DC, that the war is ended. Jackson gives thanks to heaven, revokes and...

(read more from the Chapter 22 Summary)

This section contains 631 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Andrew Jackson: His Life and Times Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
Andrew Jackson: His Life and Times from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook