Andrew Jackson: His Life and Times - Chapters 10-11 Summary & Analysis

H. W. Brands
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Chapters 10-11 Summary and Analysis

"Affair of Honor" examines another instance of Jackson and dueling. At forty, he finds himself in Sevier's position years earlier - a mark for younger men out to win a reputation. It also pulls in how Burr's victory over Hamilton is political suicide. "All Must Feel the Injuries" continues the story as Jackson kills an opponent and begins recovering from his own wound.

Since his disadvantaged youth, Jackson loves racehorses. At sixteen, he is authorized to appraise horseflesh and by 1804, with the acquisition of the famous Truxton, he is a leading force in Nashville's racing community. In 1805, Joseph Erwin wagers $2,000 against Truxton, and reneges. Thomas Swann intervenes, tangles verbally with Jackson and calls him out, but is brushed aside. Charles Dickinson, Erwin's son-in-law and partner, disparages Rachel, Swann confronts Jackson in a tavern, is thrashed, and runs to the...

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This section contains 503 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Andrew Jackson: His Life and Times Study Guide
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