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An American Hero: The True Story of Charles a. Lindbergh Chapter Summary & Analysis - Chapter 11 Summary

Barry Denenberg
This Study Guide consists of approximately 28 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of An American Hero.
This section contains 378 words
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Chapter 11 Summary and Analysis

Lindbergh returned to the United States in April 1939, and immediately resigned his commission in the military so that he could speak freely about political issues, as a civilian. He advocated an isolationist foreign policy, and he urged the United States not to enter World War II. Lindbergh felt that Nazi Germany was invincible, and besides, Nazi Germany wasn't that bad anyway. Lindbergh issued a nationwide radio address that attracted a large audience, and many in America agreed with him at that time. Roosevelt offered him a cabinet post if he would tow the administration's line, but Lindbergh refused.

By late 1940, American public opinion was changing as Nazism became a more obvious threat, and Lindbergh started to become a minority voice. Then, at the Battle of Dunkirk, England's Royal Air Force scored decisive wins against the German Luftwaffe, casting into doubt Lindbergh's long-held assertion that the...

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This section contains 378 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our An American Hero: The True Story of Charles a. Lindbergh Study Guide
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An American Hero: The True Story of Charles a. Lindbergh from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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