The American Language - Chapter 9.6 Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 92 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The American Language.
This section contains 292 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The American Language Study Guide

Chapter 9.6 Summary

The author remarks that only two areas of noun inflection contain variations. One is in the nominative case, he notes, and the other is in the genitive case. He finds one variation in a rule that is disregarded: that the -s to pluralize compound nouns goes at the end of the principle noun. The ending -s is now, he says, put at the end. He finds the other variation in a similar rule. When the noun is used as the object of the sentence, its relative parts are treated equally. That is, the verb of a singular noun is also singular; the verb of a plural noun must agree in plural form. This rule, too, has been mistreated, Mencken finds, making for more confounded, complicated language.

Chapter 9.6 Analysis

Mencken finds two areas of decay where noun inflection is concerned - one in a nominative case tendency and...

(read more from the Chapter 9.6 Summary)

This section contains 292 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The American Language Study Guide
Copyrights
Nonfiction Classics for Students
The American Language from Nonfiction Classics for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.