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Books Like All My Sons by Arthur Miller | Suggesting Reading

This Study Guide consists of approximately 84 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of All My Sons.
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What Do I Read Next?

Aristotle's Poetics offers a descriptive definition of ancient Greek tragedy. For some theorists, it is the ultimate critical authority on the nature of tragedy.

Eugene O'Neill, in Long Day's Journey into Night (1956), comes as close as Miller does to writing a modern, family tragedy.

An important sociological study, The Lonely Crowd (1969), by David Reisman, suggests that modern America has lost the capacity for guilt (necessary to tragedy).

Culture of Narcissism: American Life in an Age of Diminishing Expectations (1991, revised edition), by Christopher Lasch, a more recent look at American culture, examines the changing cultural landscape.

Stuart D. Brandes's study, Warhogs: A History of War Profits in America (1997), is a thorough history of wartime profiteering in the United States, both before and since World War II.

(read more from the What Do I Read Next? section)

This section contains 129 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Purchase our All My Sons Study Guide
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All My Sons from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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