All For Love: More Sentiment than Tragedy - Act I: Prologue Summary & Analysis

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Summary

Seventeenth century plays usually begin with a prologue and end with an epilogue. Both are in blank verse rhymed couplets. Frequently, a prologue is used to tempt, implore, or cajole the audience, in order to gain favor for the play. In William Congreve's 1700 comedy, The Way of the World, for example, Anne Bracegirdle, who originated the role of the heroine, Millamant, tells the audience it can glory in Millamant's flirting with her suitor, Mirabel, because Bracegirdle herself is unfailingly virtuous. In this 1677 prologue, however, the play's author, John Dryden, addresses the audience member as a critic, and he instructs his audience about how to critique the play. He warns audience members that the play does not have many rhymes (unusual for the Restoration period), and he warns them of the ways the characters do not adhere to seventeenth century decorum. He also...

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This section contains 776 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the All For Love: More Sentiment than Tragedy Study Guide
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