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Gertrude Stein Writing Styles in The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas

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Style

Point of View

A story's point of view refers to its mode of narration, that is, whose eyes the action is seen through and whose mind presents the information. Autobiographies, by definition, are written by the person the book is about. They are told in the first person and the narrator is a major character around which the action revolves. Stein complicates this convention by writing an autobiography about herself but told by Alice B. Toklas, as if Stein were Toklas. In fact, the fictional Toklas is a minor character in her own "autobiography." Such a narrative trick underscores not only the fictional aspects of Stein's book but by implication, of all autobiographies. Stein reveals her authorship of the book in the last paragraph:

About six weeks ago Gertrude Stein said, it does not look to me as if you were ever going to write that autobiography. You know...

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This section contains 287 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas Study Guide
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The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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