Alias Grace Social Concerns

This Study Guide consists of approximately 37 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Alias Grace.
This section contains 1,232 words
(approx. 4 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Alias Grace Study Guide

Margaret Atwood further solidified her international reputation by winning the Booker Prize for The Blind Assassin (2000), and Alias Grace was also short-listed for the Booker Prize in the year of its publication, 1996. During that same year, it won the Giller Prize, a prestigious Canadian award for fiction. Early in her career and over her constant objections, Atwood was classified as a feminist because of certain recurring motifs and because her career took flight during the late 1960s and into the 1970s, the heyday of feminism. She has shown that she is far more than this single perspective would indicate, that her approaches to politics and literature are global and multifaceted and that she is enthusiastically involved in bringing about positive change.

While it is true that Atwood's foremost social concern is the treatment of women and that her female characters tend to be either powerful heroines or male-dominated...

(read more from the Social Concerns section)

This section contains 1,232 words
(approx. 4 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Alias Grace Study Guide
Copyrights
Novels for Students
Alias Grace from Novels for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.