Alexander Hamilton (biography) - Chapter 27 – Chapter 35 Summary & Analysis

Ron Chernow
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Summary

In Chapter 27: Sugar Plums and Toys, Hamilton, now 40, seeks to restore his family’s finances and settle his debts, having made only $3,500 a year as Treasury Secretary. Hamilton resumes his private law practice to begin earning money. Word comes of Jay’s treaty with the British, which many believes gives away too much, such as failing to obtain satisfaction for American sailors abducted by the British Navy, and for giving Britain most-favored-nation status in trade imports. The Treaty does secure freedom of trade with the West Indies and arbitration for merchants whose cargo has been seized. The Treaty flares up Republican and Federalist rivalry once more. Hamilton longs to make his thoughts known on the subject, but respectfully does not advance his opinions. Washington writes to Hamilton, asking for his thoughts, during which time Hamilton gleefully responds. Hamilton supports the treaty, and urges...

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This section contains 2,720 words
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Buy the Alexander Hamilton (biography) Study Guide
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