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Margaret I. Rostkowski Writing Styles in After the Dancing Days

This Study Guide consists of approximately 41 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of After the Dancing Days.
This section contains 816 words
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Style

Point of View

The novel is written in the first person point of view, which means that the story is told from the protagonist's or narrator's viewpoint. In this story, Annie is the protagonist; and all activity and personal thoughts are perceived from Annie's perspective. As opposed to a third person point of view, that provides both plot information, as well as thoughts and feelings of other characters, the first person point of view allows the author to share the plot and emotions and feelings of the narrator only. The author chooses this point of view to develop Annie's character in more depth than any of the other characters, providing a deeper sense of intimacy with Annie and her thoughts and emotions.

The author chooses this perspective because the story is about Annie's growth and maturity. The reader can experience her progress as the novel expands through this point...

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This section contains 816 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our After the Dancing Days Study Guide
Copyrights
After the Dancing Days from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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