Madeleine L'Engle Writing Styles in A Wind in the Door

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Point of View

The point of view throughout the novel is restricted to what Meg thinks, feels, sees and hears, and it is presented in the third person. This is called a third-person semi-omniscient narrator because it allows access to one (or sometimes a limited number of) character's thoughts, while an omniscient narrator has access to all the characters' minds. Teenaged Meg has much to learn. Each of the other characters provides important lessons, but oftentimes these lessons must be repeated several times before Meg grasps their significance. Meg is not the only one who has trouble absorbing new ideas. Mr. Jenkins and Sporos are slow to understand as well, which allows the author to employ the narrative technique of repetition to bring home the unique ideas that she wishes to convey through her narrative.

Usually when the narrative viewpoint is restricted to the protagonist, the thoughts of the...

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This section contains 1,173 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A Wind in the Door Study Guide
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