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A Visit to William Blake's Inn Chapter Summary & Analysis - Poem 14, "The Tiger Asks Blake for a Bedtime Story" Summary

Nancy Willard
This Study Guide consists of approximately 63 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of A Visit to William Blake's Inn.
This section contains 719 words
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Poem 14, "The Tiger Asks Blake for a Bedtime Story" Summary

This poem has the exact rhythm and rhyme of the famed "Tyger, Tyger, burning bright" by William Blake. This is the rather rare trochaic rhythmic form, with two-syllable scansion with emphasis on the first syllable. Much more poetry in English occurs in iambic form with the emphasis on the second syllable.

This poem is a confessional. The tiger has been doing a little stealing, nothing much, just some food items. The tiger calls upon Blake to get his roar back and restore his good health. The tiger thinks that his petty pilfering has caused an elemental ill for himself, which may very well be true in the spiritual and mystical world where Blake lives. In stanza one, the tiger talks to William, writing late in the cold night, since...

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This section contains 719 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our A Visit to William Blake's Inn Study Guide
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A Visit to William Blake's Inn from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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