A Treatise of Human Nature - Book 3, Part 3, Of the Other Virtues and Vices Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 30 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of A Treatise of Human Nature.
This section contains 449 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A Treatise of Human Nature Study Guide

Book 3, Part 3, Of the Other Virtues and Vices Summary and Analysis

Part III of Book III discusses Hume's account of the natural virtues. They are rooted in human nature, not in social evolution and derive from natural passions and dispositions. Artificial virtue contributes to the common good but many private virtues only benefit the possessor. Hume does not give an exhaustive list of natural virtues but specifies a few, such as well-founded pride, fidelity, friendship, and the like. Natural abilities are virtues as well, such as industry and perseverance, which are useful. There are natural vices that are contraries.

When we see the natural virtues of others, sympathy produces pleasure and pain within us. Hume argues that we are motivated primarily by pleasure and pain or the expectation of it and that objects or qualities which produce these...

(read more from the Book 3, Part 3, Of the Other Virtues and Vices Summary)

This section contains 449 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A Treatise of Human Nature Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
A Treatise of Human Nature from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook