A Treatise of Human Nature - Book 2, Part 3, Of the Will and Direct Passions Summary & Analysis

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Book 2, Part 3, Of the Will and Direct Passions Summary and Analysis

Part 3 of Book II advances and defends Hume's unique conception of the will as a feeling rather than a power. He believes that a proper understanding of the will is crucial to a proper account of the passions. For Hume the will is simply not a power of choice.

Instead, the will is an impression of volition that accompanies direct passions. One feels the impression of volition, for instance, whenever one desires a good. Hume knows he faces some puzzles here though because he is rejecting the doctrine of free will. The feeling of volition is simply an illusion. The will is completely determined by other causes. After all, for Hume, the will is simply an impression. Hume now attempts to refute the doctrine of free will...

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This section contains 799 words
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Buy the A Treatise of Human Nature Study Guide
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