A Tempest: Based on Shakespeare's The Tempest, Adaptation for a Black Theatre Summary & Study Guide

This Study Guide consists of approximately 32 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of A Tempest.
This section contains 565 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
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A Tempest: Based on Shakespeare's The Tempest, Adaptation for a Black Theatre Summary & Study Guide Description

A Tempest: Based on Shakespeare's The Tempest, Adaptation for a Black Theatre Summary & Study Guide includes comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book. This study guide contains the following sections:

This detailed literature summary also contains Topics for Discussion and a Free Quiz on A Tempest: Based on Shakespeare's The Tempest, Adaptation for a Black Theatre by Aimé Césaire.

"A Tempest" by Aime Cesaire is a play based largely on Shakespeare's "The Tempest" with only a few changes. Cesaire's version of this play explores the original concepts in further depth by incorporating the themes of colonialism and Negritude which Cesaire studied extensively. "A Tempest" addresses modernist issues and theories through the utilization of a classic play that most modern readers are familiar with.

This book begins with an Introduction which provides a brief biography of the author, Aime Cesaire, and a synopsis of his works. In the Prologue, the Master of Ceremonies assigns the roles in the play to various actors and instructs the play to begin. In Act 1, Scene 1, a ship containing nobles, including King Alonso of Naples, sinks near magical islands far from their homeland in Europe. Act 1, Scene 2 shows Prospero, a magician and sorcerer admitting to Miranda, his daughter, that he caused the shipwreck with the help of Ariel, a sea nymph that he has enslaved. Furthermore, Prospero tells Miranda about his past and subsequent exile to the Island, which is the reason that he causes the shipwreck: to seek revenge against the nobles' treachery. Prospero instructs Ariel in how to treat their visitors and orders Caliban to gather a great quantity of wood and water. Caliban's rebellion angers Prospero. When Ferdinand meets Miranda, he willingly accepts the slavery to which Prospero subjects him. In Act 2, Scene 1, Ariel warns Caliban that Prospero will seek vengeance against him for his disobedience, but Caliban wants war with Prospero. In Act 2, Scene 2, Alonso, Gonzalo, Antonio and Sebastian wonder about the Island and its inhabitants as they admire its beauty. Prospero torments them by presenting them with food only to retract it. In the next scene, Antonio and Sebastian conspire against Alonso and Gonzalo, but Ariel wakes and warns Alonso and Gonzalo. Ariel also offers Prospero's forgiveness to all of the nobles if they repent of their crimes against him, and they all acquiesce.

In Act 3, Scene 1, Ferdinand flirts with Miranda as he works as Prospero's slave. When Prospero praises Ferdinand's hard work, he invites him back to his house before yelling at Caliban who sings of freedom and hides from approaching men he believes to be Prospero's agents. In the next scene, Tinculo and Stephano find Caliban whom they plan to sell to a carnival in Europe, but when Stephano proclaims himself king of the Island, Caliban rallies them to battle and to overthrow Prospero. In Act 3, Scene 3, Prospero hosts a celebration of Miranda and Ferdinand's engagement where the goddesses bless the upcoming nuptials. When Eshu appears uninvited, Prospero swears vengeance against Caliban. In Act 3, Scene 4, at Prospero's command, Ariel torments Caliban during the night as he plots his attack on Prospero. On their way to battle, Trinculo and Stephano grow distracted, and Prospero commands Ariel to imprison Caliban, Trinculo and Stephano. In the final scene, Alonso is reunited with his son and rejoices in the engagement between Miranda and Ferdinand. Prospero forgives his offenders and releases Ariel from slavery. Since Caliban refuses to repent for his disobedience, Prospero decides to stay on the Island. The nobles return to Naples with Miranda to celebrate the nuptials of Ferdinand and Miranda, and Prospero stays on the Island where he continues his contest of wills with Caliban who sings about freedom.

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This section contains 565 words
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Buy the A Tempest: Based on Shakespeare's The Tempest, Adaptation for a Black Theatre Study Guide
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