A Short History of Nearly Everything - Part 5, Chapter 17 Summary & Analysis

Bill Bryson
This Study Guide consists of approximately 59 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of A Short History of Nearly Everything.
This section contains 750 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A Short History of Nearly Everything Study Guide

Part 5, Chapter 17 Summary and Analysis

The atmosphere keeps the Earth warm. Without it, the Earth would be a ball of ice with an average temperature of -60?F. In addition, the atmosphere absorbs or deflects a variety hazards, including cosmic rays, charged particles, ultraviolet rays, etc. At 120 miles deep, the atmosphere seems thick. However, if the Earth were the size of a desk globe, the atmosphere would be no thicker than a few coats of varnish.

The first layer of atmosphere, next to the ground, is called the troposphere. This layer contains the majority of oxygen in the air and all water. It accounts for 80 percent of the mass of the total atmosphere. In a fast elevator, one could reach the top of the troposphere in 20 minutes. Anyone would be uncomfortable there, though, because the average temperature is -70?F and the oxygen is...

(read more from the Part 5, Chapter 17 Summary)

This section contains 750 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A Short History of Nearly Everything Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
A Short History of Nearly Everything from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.