A Philosophical Enquiry Into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful - Introduction On Taste Part II Summary & Analysis

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Sight operates like taste, in the way that men perceive objects the same way. A peacock is more beautiful than a hen to most anyone, a sunrise is beautiful, light is more pleasing than darkness. In fact, sight is less complicated than taste because taste has a medicinal component; that is, some have learned to tolerate bad-tasting drugs or herbs because of the positive health effect they have on the body.

Imagination is also involved in perception, as it can add something new to that which is perceived; however, Imagination is limited by sensory experience; one's imagination must start with an actual object - it cannot start with nothing. Therefore, even the imagination starts with the same basic standards laid down by the Senses - that is, that sweet things are tasty and light is preferred to...

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