A Man Without a Country - Chapter 6, "I Have Been Called a Luddite" Summary & Analysis

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Chapter 6, "I Have Been Called a Luddite" Summary

Vonnegut begins this chapter with a description of what a Luddite is, and why he is proud to be one. A Luddite is a person who hates the advancement of technology, named after Ned Lud, who was a textile worker who smashed a machine that would put him out of a job and thus cause his family to starve. Vonnegut goes on to describe how he misses typewriters, and how it is impossible to find one anywhere anymore. He mentions the first typewritten novel as Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn, a mention that obviously brings strength to his point, and then continues to why computers bug him.

To show why he would prefer a typewriter, Vonnegut traces his steps through a normal morning that would occur after typing twenty or thirty pages...

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This section contains 607 words
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