A Kierkegaard Anthology - Chapter 4, Fear and Trembling Summary & Analysis

Robert W. Bretall
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All of Kierkegaard's pseudonymous writings are produced for Regina but are so dedicated for many different reasons. Fear and Trembling is perhaps the most direct and Kierkegaard believes that it represents his entire life. In it, Kierkegaard famously meditates on Abraham's call to kill his only son Isaac. In the same way, Kierkegaard sees himself as forced to give up Regina, which is "immoral" in the same sense. However, no one can understand the parallel from outside of Kierkegaard's life. This somewhat illustrates Kierkegaard's love for mystery. In Kierkegaard's view, Regina is more likely than anyone else to comprehend the ideas in the book.

However, Fear and Trembling has an importance beyond its peculiar circumstances. Instead, the work ranks among the great works of philosophical history. Its theme is the encounter between the individual and the universal. Scientific truth...

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This section contains 429 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A Kierkegaard Anthology Study Guide
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